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789

letters

37

speeches

1

autobiographical writing

565

unpublished materials

#

documents available for transcription

News

New Content in the Frederick Douglass Digital Edition

May 2022

The Frederick Douglass Papers is pleased to announce its latest web release. This release features Frederick Douglass to Gerrit Smith, May 1, 1851; Frederick Douglass to Thomas Auld, September 8, 1848; and hundreds of new documents from Speeches, Volume 1 and Correspondence, Volume 1.

Unpublished Documents

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Explore the unpublished documents

Transcribe Frederick Douglass Papers

In recent years, the Douglass Papers has launched an initiative to add critically-verified transcriptions of the thousands of letters, to and from Douglass, that could not be included in or selective print edition. The project invites volunteers from the public interested in having more of Douglass word available to scholars, students, and general readers to enlist in this effort by visiting our electronic "work site" hosted by the website FromThePage and sign up to transcribe. In the future, texts of Douglass editorials and speeches not found in the print edition will also be added.

Start transcribing

Featured Documents

Browse below to see featured documents from the Frederick Douglass Papers Digital Edition.

About the Frederick Douglass Papers Project

Born into slavery in Talbot County, Maryland, Frederick Douglass (1818-95) became one of the most influential human rights activist of the nineteenth century, as well as an internationally acclaimed statesmen, orator, editor, and author. The Frederick Douglass Papers collects, edits, and publishes in books and online the speeches, letters, autobiographies, and other writings of Frederick Douglass. The project's primary aim has been to make the surviving works by this African American figure accessible to a broad audience, much as similar projects have done for the papers of notable white historical and literary figures.

About the project

Published Volumes

The original heart of the project is the publication by Yale University Press of fifteen volumes of the most historically significant of Douglass’s works; nine of these volumes have been published so far, as well as several ancillary paperback volumes.

View all published volumes